High employee turnover affects organizational performance.

The Impact of High Employee Turnover (and What to Do About It)

High employee turnover affects organizational performance.
The cost of replacing a departing employee can be staggering – in some cases the equivalent of a full year’s salary. Sourcing, landing and onboarding costs are substantial, and those investments of time and energy are lost along with the employee’s knowledge and expertise. But there are other impacts that come with high employee turnover beyond the obvious loss of that individual. 

Here’s why you need to be concerned if your talent is leaving the fold in large numbers.

A Meta-Study
This study, discussed in the journal of Applied Psychology, conducted a meta-analysis of over 300 correlations between turnover rates and organizational performance. The authors found that, “the relationship between total turnover rates and organizational performance is significant and negative.” Specifically:

  • Turnover of 1 standard deviation contributed towards a 0.15 drop in organizational performance
  • The greater the turnover, the greater the drop in performance
  • The largest negative effects were found in customer satisfaction and quality
  • Turnover negatively affected employee attitude and productivity
  • Industries that were human capital centric were particularly impacted 
  • Knowledge critical businesses, where the loss of an experienced employee would be keenly felt, were negatively impacted by high turnover
  • Smaller companies struggled more than larger companies if there was high turnover

Team Impact
The impact of employee turnover is most often felt at the team level. The remaining team, at least initially, must absorb their departing team member’s workload. This can lead to a decline in productivity, as the team struggles to manage their previous duties on top of their new responsibilities. When multiple employees leave, the workload can become unmanageable, leading to additional resignations.

How to Retain Talent
How to Retain Top Finance and Accounting Talent” explores some of the progressive strategies that companies are currently using to retain their best employees. Strategies include:

  • Making balance a priority - a study of organizations that had wellness programs in place reported that 69% of the participants felt increased engagement at work
  • Building flexibility into the company’s culture
  • Customizing benefits to an employee’s needs, rather than offering a one-size-fits- all approach
  • Offering professional development opportunities 
  • Discussing potential career paths and advancement
  • Conducting “stay interviews” 

Key Takeaways
High employee turnover creates a cascade of negative effects.  Departing employees take with them acquired knowledge and specific expertise. The void left behind can be difficult to fill with existing staff. If an organization is struggling with high employee turnover it’s critical to create and implement a retention strategy that addresses the key issues causing employees to leave. Progressive companies are changing their cultures to retain top talent, making balance a priority and offering flexible work options. Benefits are tailored to the employee, and paths to career advancement are clearly communicated. Whether it’s because of downsizing, or a culture in need of change, high turnover comes with a high price tag and needs to be addressed.

Your Next Step
No one should walk the job search or hiring road alone. At Clarity Recruitment we help others realize their success through a process that marries proprietary technology with unwavering commitment. Contact us today to take control of your career, or to partner with us to hire well.

Clarity Recruitment, connecting exceptional people with remarkable companies.


Making a remote employees feel like they’re part of the team.

How to Onboard a Remote Employee

Making a remote employees feel like they’re part of the team.
It’s Monday at 9 AM and Karen’s first day on the job. Of course, Karen isn’t in the office. She’s the team’s first remote employee. This makes the usual welcoming procedures for her first day somewhat difficult. 

Onboarding a remote employee can be a tricky process, but doing it correctly can be the difference between having the employee feel connected or not. The onboarding process, in fact, should start before the employee ever walks through the door. 

Here are some tips for making sure that your remote employee feels like a part of the team.

Paperwork
Send all paperwork, such as tax, payroll and insurance forms via email. Make sure that a follow-up call is done to help the new employee fill-in the paperwork properly, and to answer any questions regarding the forms.

Have them sign and submit the paperwork electronically.

Laptops and Technology
Ship a laptop and other things needed to equip their home office. Make sure that the laptop comes pre-installed with all of the software that the employee will need. Have someone from your team orient the new hire on the organization’s systems and processes. 

Consider establishing a policy where the remote hire can go out and purchase office supplies up to a certain amount and then get reimbursed.

The Mentor
The first 2 months for a remote hire can feel overwhelming. Establish a key contact for the new hire to help them through the first few weeks (and beyond).The mentor can help the new employee adjust, troubleshoot and feel like a part of the team.

The Team
Use videoconferencing (assuming that the new hire can’t come into the office for the first few days) to introduce the new hire to the rest of the team. According to this article from the Society for Human Resource Management, video conferencing can be a valuable tool for keeping remote hires connected to the organization.

Discuss Expectations
Have the remote employee’s manager connect prior to the start date. Encourage the conversation to be a two-way street, where expectations are discussed. Typically, remote employees are highly self-motivated and self-directed. In fact, research shows that they are almost twice as likely to work longer hours than their on-site counterparts. That being said, establishing specific, measurable outcomes for what the remote employee needs to accomplish is critical to ensuring productivity and preventing burnout. Discuss which specific hours the employee needs to be available.

Regular Contact
Regular one-on-one’s must be scheduled to ensure that the remote employee feels connected to the team. One-on-ones allow managers to give and receive feedback. They are also critical for tracking progress and course correcting if needed.

Conference call the remote employee into all team meetings. It will be hard for the remote employee to build bonds with the rest of the team, so encourage some level of digital camaraderie. Maybe it’s a monthly, online team meeting, but however it’s pursued, infusing the company culture into digital interactions is critical in keeping a remote employee connected.

Read this article from the Harvard Business Review to learn how to have productive one-on-ones.

In the Office
It goes without saying, that face-to-face interaction is valuable in facilitating a connection between employees and an organization. If possible, have your remote worker meet team members and key stakeholders in person, or periodically come into the office (this is all subject to geographical location of course). The occasional visit will go a long way to making the remote employee feel like a part of team.

Key Takeaways
Conducting a proper onboarding process for remote employees is critical for maximizing productivity and retaining a potentially valuable team member. Ensure that the remote employee feels connected to the rest of the team whether it’s through regular conference calls, video chats or team meetings. Send all of the equipment and software that the employee needs in advance. Schedule regular one-on-one meetings to give and receive feedback, and have a mentor in place to help guide the remote employee during their first few weeks (and beyond). Establish expectations from the beginning and be prepared to offer additional support to a remote employee as they adjust to their role.

Your Next Step
No one should walk the job search or hiring road alone. At Clarity Recruitment we help others realize their success through a process that marries proprietary technology with unwavering commitment. Contact us today to take control of your career, or to partner with us to hire well.

Clarity Recruitment, connecting exceptional people with remarkable companies.


How to be a great mentor and make a difference.

How to Be a Mentor That Makes a Difference

How to be a great mentor and make a difference.
We talk a lot about how everyone can benefit from a mentor regardless of position. But what actually makes a great mentor? It is, after all, a serious responsibility. A mentor must believe in their mentee and offer constructive guidance at critical junctures. 

Thinking of becoming a mentor? Here’s how to be a great one.

Not Just an Employee
A mentor who learns about their mentee’s personal life can give more constructive guidance. The mentor will understand which external factors are influencing the mentee’s perspective and what advice will help them the most.

Openness to Learning
Be open to learning from your mentee. Not only will this build trust and validate the mentee’s sense of professional self-worth, but it will likely open you to new ideas and make you test your own assumptions.

Continue to grow your own skill set. Take classes, attend speaking engagements and educate yourself on industry trends. This will make you a more valuable source of knowledge, and demonstrate to your mentee that education pays off.

Commitment
Commit time on a regular basis to mentoring your mentee. Whether it’s biweekly or monthly check-in’s, following through is a critical part of being a successful mentor.

ReadMentoring Myths that are Hurting Your Finance Team” to learn about how different, long-standing myths can limit your effectiveness as a mentor.

Be a Sounding Board
Listen to understand, not just to reply. Be willing to ask questions that will help guide the mentor to a decision. 

Goal Setting
You set goals for yourself and your team (if applicable). It makes sense, therefore, that you collaboratively create mutually agreed-upon goals for the mentoring relationship. This can create accountability, as well as give direction (at least initially) to your meetings and conversations.

Have a Mentor
Connect with people from other industries and have a mentor who can offer advice that you trust. The more diversified your network, the more you’ll be able to offer valuable feedback to your mentee.

Want to ask someone to be your mentor? Read this.

Suspend Judgment
Try to operate from a posture of service, not judgement. The mentee must feel that you have their best interests at heart. This will come when the mentee understands that you can empathize with their situation and challenges.

At the same time, be willing to give constructive feedback if the need arises. This can be a delicate balancing act as you help your mentee evaluate a different approach. The goal is to help the mentee learn how to leverage their strengths and mitigate their weaknesses.

Model Behaviors
Model the behaviors that you’d like to see your mentee develop.

The Long Haul
Mentoring requires patience – an awareness that this is not a short-term process. By committing to a long-term mentor/mentee relationship, there is a chance to see advice come to fruition and to reflect on the impact of various decisions.

Key Takeaways
Being a mentor is not a short-term commitment to be taken lightly. Great mentors lead by example, listen to understand and get to know the mentee as more than just an employee. Successful mentors operate from a place of service. They offer constructive feedback, help with goal setting and continue to grow their own skill set. While a good mentor can instruct and guide, the great ones inspire. 

Your Next Step
No one should walk the job search or hiring road alone. At Clarity Recruitment we help others realize their success through a process that marries proprietary technology with unwavering commitment. Contact us today to take control of your career, or to partner with us to hire well.

Clarity Recruitment, connecting exceptional people with remarkable companies.


How to build an all-star finance team.

How to Build a Finance Dream Team

How to build an all-star finance team.
The years 1983 to 1990 will forever be enshrined in the mind of every Edmonton Oilers’ fan. They were the dynasty years, when the team ruled the ice and won 5 Stanley Cups.  They illustrate what can happen when a team is in sync, and has great leadership at the helm.

So the question is – how do you build a finance dream team that can help your organization achieve its “Stanley Cup?” 

The Vision
It all starts by defining the vision. As a finance leader carefully build your vision of the finance function. Tap other sources of information to inform your thinking, including line of business leaders. Get insight into how finance can act as a business partner. Establish a direction based on this feedback and then set priorities.

Evaluate the Team
One of the most important steps in the process is to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of your team. Is each individual being used to best effect? Are you leveraging their strengths and helping them develop strategies to mitigate their weaknesses? Meeting with team members one-on-one helps you to give and receive timely feedback that can help with the evaluation process. Setting milestones for each individual can fuel the motivation to succeed. 

Pro Tip: Consider, as well, creating a culture of learning. It will help the growth of your current team, but also serve as an attractive enticement to top performers who are typically committed to continuous improvement.

Needs Assessment
When you evaluated your team, you may have noted gaps that cannot be filled with existing members. In this case, you’ll need to hire. Evaluate what kind of talent and skills you need to achieve the vision. Meet with the stakeholders most impacted by the hiring decision and source their input as to what they feel is needed to succeed in the role. Consider company culture and soft skills such as relationship building and communication. Technical fit is only one piece of the puzzle. Above all else, don’t get caught up in trying to find the “perfect” candidate. 

Collaborative Communication
If you believe that leadership comes from within the team, and your communication style supports that belief, your team will buy-in. Ask for their input consistently. Develop a collaborative approach to solving problems. Stress accountability and at the same time be available if they need to check in. 

According to an article from Forbes, there are specific habits that highly collaborative organizations demonstrate, such as:

  • The leaders model collaboration
  • Employees are told how decisions will impact them individually
  • Companies consider why collaboration is important and what they hope to achieve from it, before implementing any substantial changes
  • Employees are encouraged to talk to everyone – the collaborative culture is not policed
  • Employees are part of the decision-making process and their ideas are integrated into a strategy
  • Collaboration should never be seen as something else to be done, but rather a natural part of workflow
  • Teamwork is rewarded

Read: To read the full article from Forbes click here.

Promote Internally
Sometimes you’ll need to hire externally because your team simply doesn’t have the skills or expertise necessary. But if possible try to promote from within. This sends a powerful message that hard work will be rewarded. The result: a team that is committed to helping achieve the company’s vision.

ReadHow to Tell if an Employee is Ready to Be a Finance Manager” to understand the signs that a team member is ready to make the leap to greater responsibility.

Key Takeaways
To build a finance dream team involves several key steps. Craft a vision for the team based on organizational goals and the role of the finance team as business partner. Assess your team and determine if you are using them to best effect. If there are any gaps that the existing team cannot fill, then be open to hiring. List the needs of the role based on feedback from stakeholders.  When speaking to your team be collaborative in your approach and encourage a culture of learning. Finally, promoting internally shows that hard work will be rewarded and increases the odds that your team will buy-in to your vision.

Your Next Step
No one should walk the job search or hiring road alone. At Clarity Recruitment we help others realize their success through a process that marries proprietary technology with unwavering commitment. Contact us today to take control of your career, or to partner with us to hire well.

Clarity Recruitment, connecting exceptional people with remarkable companies.


Losing a finance team member.

Red Alert: You’re About to Lose a Finance Team Member

Leaving your jobWe shouldn’t be surprised when a finance team member walks out the door, and yet many of us have been caught flat-footed by an employee resignation. And while no manager is a fortune teller, there are definitely red flags to pay attention to.

Here are some warning signs that you’re about to lose a finance team member.

Why People Leave
There are a number of reasons people leave:

  • Poor management
  • Lack of career progression
  • Salary not meeting market expectations
  • A lack of work/life balance - too many overtime hours
  • Dysfunctional team
  • Limited flexibility

The Warning Signs
The Harvard Business Review researched the signs exhibited by employees who were about to quit. The study found 13 pre-quitting behaviors:

  • Work productivity decreased
  • Decreased commitment to being a team player
  • Only completed the minimum amount of work
  • Exhibited a disinterest in pleasing their manager
  • Less of an interest in committing to long-term timelines
  • Overall negative change in attitude
  • Less motivation than usual
  • Less focus on job-related tasks
  • Expressed dissatisfaction with their job more frequently than usual
  • Expressed dissatisfaction with their manager more frequently than usual
  • Leaving work early
  • No enthusiasm for the mission of the organization anymore
  • Decreased interest in working with customers

Read this study to learn more about the warning signs that an employee is considering quitting.

What to Do
What can you do as a manager if one of your employees is exhibiting the warning signs above? The study makes a key recommendation which is to conduct “stay interviews.” These regular, one-on-one meetings focus on finding out what keeps employees working for an organization. This proactive approach can result in retaining employees who might otherwise become a flight risk. Other suggestions include:

  • Involving the employee in a new project or initiative that connects to their passion or interest
  • Making sure employees feel valued as individuals – managers must build rapport and demonstrate a commitment to employee well-being
  • Ensuring a consistently open channel of communication so that employees feel comfortable expressing dissatisfaction – don’t dismiss these conversations, take action as soon as possible

Read this blog to learn what progressive organizations are doing to retain top talent.

Key Takeaways
There are often signs that tell us someone is about to exit stage left. Decreased motivation, productivity and commitment to their manager and team are indications that an employee is potentially looking to transition. By being aware of the signals, conducting “stay’ interviews” and taking proactive steps, we can hopefully prevent our talent from walking out the door.

Your Next Step
No one should walk the job search or hiring road alone. At Clarity Recruitment we help others realize their success through a process that marries proprietary technology with unwavering commitment. Contact us today to take control of your career, or to partner with us to hire well.

Clarity Recruitment, connecting exceptional people with remarkable companies.


Tips for retaining employees after a merger or acquisition.

How to Retain Your Employees after a Merger or Acquisition

Tips for retaining employees after a merger or acquisition.
No one person is more important than the whole. That’s the going wisdom. And while it may be true, a merger or acquisition can see your intellectual capital and top performers heading out the door. To prevent this from happening, there are several key strategies that you can employ.

Why Talent Leaves in the First Place
Talent may perceive a merger or acquisition as a threat to existing culture and organizational direction. They may feel insecure about their future and lose trust in leadership. All of these things can be compounded by poor communication from a senior team, or a perception that there will be a substantial increase in workload.

So what can you do to hold onto the difference makers in your organization?

Retention Incentives
Some companies believe that offering a retention incentive will be enough to hold on to staff during a merger or acquisition. According to McKinsey & Company, however, “many of the recipients would have stayed put anyway” without the incentive and that most “have concerns that money alone can’t address.” McKinsey recommends a more tailored approach, where the critical, key players who are most at risk of leaving are offered a “mix of financial and nonfinancial incentives tailored to their aspirations.” 

The result: When a European industrial company applied this approach they required only 25% of the budget that they had previously spent on a cash-based retention strategy. 

Don’t Just Focus on the Obvious
McKinsey & Company’s research showed that companies typically tend to focus on retaining senior leadership. By doing so they neglect to retain key employees whose skills, or even social networks, are critical to the smooth functioning of the business. “Even if the employees’ performance and career potential are unexceptional, their institutional knowledge, direct relationships, or technical expertise can make their retention critical.”

Credible Leadership
Rebuilding trust is critical to retaining staff after a merger or acquisition. When Deloitte took a closer look at the data from 2750 employee surveys from an international professional services organization, they found some interesting results about retention. These employees had experienced multiple organizational changes as a result of an acquisition. 

One of the defining characteristics that helped to rebuild trust with employees after a merger or acquisition was credible leadership. Employees wanted leaders who offered transparency about the process, and who spoke consistently about organizational support. Management, “should be visible and set expectations regarding corporate performance and employee roles.” The most effective managers were the ones who consistently communicated the benefits of the acquisition, spoke to their employees one-on-one, and made sure that the messaging was heard correctly.

Keep Professional Development Programs In Place
Organizations may discontinue professional development programs leading up to a merger or acquisition.  Unfortunately, this sends the wrong message. By keeping professional development in place, the organization continues to send the message that its people are valued and worth investing in.

Be Careful About Workload Increases
Managers need to carefully monitor workloads after a merger or acquisition. According to Deloitte:

  • It’s imperative that managers speak to each individual one-on-one about their new role, and offer them support in developing the skills needed to complete their new responsibilities successfully.
  • Managers need to ensure that employees are coping with the new workload. 
  • Managers must continue to communicate that the employee is valued by the organization.
  • Performance management is a critical part of this process. Managers, “need to be encouraged to view the performance management process as a priority, investing time and energy in mentoring and developmental feedback discussion.”

Resource: Read this article to learn how to give effective feedback.

Key Takeaways
There are several key things to consider when trying to retain your employees after a merger or acquisition:

  • Employees need credible leadership who communicates honestly and demonstrates that the organization values their staff
  • Retention incentives are costly and not necessarily as effective as a tailored approach
  • By keeping professional development programs in place you send the message that the organization will continue to invest in its employees and their growth
  • Managers play a critical role in retaining talent
  • Increased workloads need to be managed and monitored, and the performance review process invested in
  • An effort should be made to retain employees whose knowledge, relationships and technical expertise are of value to obtaining business objectives

Your Next Step
No one should walk the job search or hiring road alone. At Clarity Recruitment we help others realize their success through a process that marries proprietary technology with unwavering commitment. Contact us today to take control of your career, or to partner with us to hire well.

Clarity Recruitment, connecting exceptional people with remarkable companies.


A new finance manager looks at the challenges to success.

How to Ensure a New Finance Manager Succeeds

A new finance manager looks at the challenges to success.
The transition to manager can be a tricky one to navigate successfully. There are new responsibilities and prestige, but also pressure to deliver on a larger scale than before. It can be a stressful and exciting time. As the manager of a new manager you have an opportunity to help the person you promoted or hired succeed in their new role.

Here’s how.

Schedule Regular One on-Ones
Meet with your new finance manager on a regular basis. Schedule meetings more frequently at the start of their tenure so that you can help them troubleshoot. Encourage an open exchange of information. Model a constructive way to give feedback so that the manager learns how to do the same with their direct reports.

Read this article from the Harvard Business Review to learn more about how to have productive one-on-ones.

Offer Task-Specific Support
You know that your new manager can deliver, it’s why you promoted or hired them in the first place. That being said, offering timely, supportive advice can help a new manager succeed.

Andy Grove, the former CEO of Intel, once said, “How often you monitor should not be based on what you believe your subordinate can do in general, but on his [or her] experience with a specific task…as the subordinate’s work improves over time, you should respond with a corresponding reduction in the intensity of the monitoring.” He called this “task relevant maturity.”

Help Them See the Big Picture
New managers can get lost in the competing demands of their new job. Help them prioritize tasks with the company’s vision and mission in mind. Remind them that they have to focus on more than just their direct reports to be successful. Finance managers are often the bridge between their reports and senior management, a role that can require the finesse of a tight rope walker.

Teach Them about Office Politics
Some people are just natural consensus builders, while others need some guidance to succeed. Consensus builders have an almost Obi-Wan Kenobi way of influencing people (no droids involved).

It’s not just about formal authority, but rather understanding that expertise, visibility and adapting information to an audience, can result in a successful outcome.

  • Help your new manager determine who might be a barrier to their success, and whose cooperation they need to obtain. 
  • Does your new manager have any way to influence these people? 
  • Is there an individual who could be an ally in this process?
  • Encourage your new manager to try to see things from other people’s perspectives to encourage them to position information in the most relevant way. 
  • Have regular meetings to discuss their success or failure at developing influence.

Most importantly, if the new manager makes a mistake, don’t overreact. Debrief and coach them on how to make a better decision next time.

The Shift to Delegating
Making a successful leap to finance manager means learning how to delegate. This can be a hard lesson for those who have regularly exceeded expectations in past roles. New managers may have problems “letting go” of tasks, believing that no one can do the job as well as them. To help your new finance manager succeed, teach them how to delegate. Explain that sometimes delegating means sourcing input from the team to determine who best could excel at a task. And remind your new manager that following up after delegating is critical to getting the kind of feedback necessary for success. After all, if the direct report is struggling, it’s best to lend support at an earlier stage, when a change of course is still possible.

ReadHow to Delegate Effectively: Top Tips for New Managers” to learn about the 7 tips that new managers can use to delegate successfully.

Encourage Education
Ideally there is a culture of learning at your organization, where individuals teach each other and education is prized. Encourage your new manager to build their skill set through formal education and to develop relationships with people who can serve as mentors, or sources of emotional support.

ReadHow to Improve Organizational Performance by Hiring Dolphins” to get tips on creating a culture of learning at your organization.

Key Takeaways
There are a number of ways you can help a new finance manager succeed. Schedule regular one-on-one’s to allow an open exchange of information. Offer task-related support and help your new manager navigate the complex world of office politics. Make sure that they keep the big picture in mind. Help them learn how to delegate and to influence decision-making. And remember, formal training or education can also be a great tool for building the skill set of the new finance manager.

Your Next Step
No one should walk the job search or hiring road alone. At Clarity Recruitment we help others realize their success through a process that marries proprietary technology with unwavering commitment. Contact us today to take control of your career, or to partner with us to hire well.

Clarity Recruitment, connecting exceptional people with remarkable companies.


Signs that your employee can work remotely.

How to Know if an Employee is Ready to Work Remotely

Signs that your employee can work remotely.
According to a 2013 Bank of Montréal poll, 47% of large businesses and 22% of small businesses offer some kind of telecommuting option. Flexible work arrangements are seen as a way to entice new staff to join and keep top performers in the fold. And while many employees would like to work remotely, not everyone can flourish in a telecommuting environment. 

Benefits to Telecommuting
The same Bank of Montréal poll found the following benefits for those businesses that offered employees a chance to telecommute:

  • 65% stated that employee productivity was positively impacted
  • 58% reported an improved quality of work from remote employees
  • 64% said that telecommuting had a positive impact on morale and their ability to retain staff
  • Over 50% found a reduction in overhead costs

Here’s how to know if an employee is ready to work remotely.

Trait #1: Drive and Motivation
An employee who consistently demonstrates initiative and self-motivation will likely transition well into a telecommuting environment.

ReadHow to Assess Motivation in a Finance Interview” for insight into identifying those employees who are passionate, driven and highly self-motivated.

Trait #2: Ability to Prioritize
Does your employee show an ability to prioritize and develop a plan to get things done? If so, they’ll likely do well as a remote worker.

Trait #3: Strong Communicator
Not only should your employee demonstrate strong verbal communication skills, but also the ability to communicate effectively in writing. Let’s face it, you won’t be able to speak every day on the phone, so it’s important that your employee be able to tell you in writing what’s been done and what is still on the ‘to do’ list.

Trait #4: Naturally Autonomous
Team players are great, but a remote employee must be able to excel on their own. In other words, can they take direction and run with it, or are they constantly looking for guidance? Carefully assess their troubleshooting and problem solving ability. They’ll need to do both well.

Trait #5: Organizational Skills
A remote employee must be able to deliver under tight timelines without any of the external prompting that an office environment would naturally provide. This means that they must possess superior organizational skills. Does your employee consistently hit deadlines?  Are they able to take a job or large project, break it down into manageable chunks and then execute? If so, you likely have a great remote worker on your hands.

Trait #6: Personal Accountability
Employees who hold themselves accountable for the quality of their work and admit to mistakes, (and then deliver a better result the next time), will have the internal motivation to succeed in a remote role.

Trait #7: Resourcefulness
Remote workers need to be adaptable and resourceful. Look for behavior that shows a passion for continuous learning, a solutions-focused mentality (which feeds resourcefulness) and a willingness to go the extra mile to get a job done.

Key Takeaways
An employee doesn’t have to work remotely 5 days a week. It’s possible to allow them to work from home periodically, or on a part-time basis. Those who flourish as a remote worker share key traits. They hold themselves to a high standard and naturally take the initiative. They’re resourceful and driven. They’re strong communicators, organized and gifted at prioritizing and planning. It makes sense for organizations to consider allowing its employees to telecommute. It’s just a matter of knowing who can be a remote worker and still deliver.

Your Next Step
No one should walk the job search or hiring road alone. At Clarity Recruitment we help others realize their success through a process that marries proprietary technology with unwavering commitment. Contact ustoday to take control of your career, or to partner with us to hire well.

Clarity Recruitment, connecting exceptional people with remarkable companies.


There are 6 mentoring myths that could be hurting your finance team’s development.

Mentoring Myths That Are Hurting Your Finance Team

There are 6 mentoring myths that could be hurting your finance team’s development.
Mentoring has evolved, and the role that it fills in any organization today is critical to attracting, developing and retaining staff. There are, however, mentoring misconceptions that can hurt the success of any mentoring program or relationship. Here are 6 common mentoring myths debunked.

Myth 1: Millennials Don’t Like Feedback
One mentoring myth is that millennials don’t like feedback. On the contrary, 75% of millennials deem mentoring critical to their success. This makes mentoring fundamental to retaining your millennial workforce. Remember, millennials are typically loyal to an individual, rather than a company. So if you want to hold on to your future finance leaders, it’s imperative to give them ongoing feedback in the form of supportive mentoring.

Myth 2: Only Junior Staff Need Mentoring
Everybody can benefit from a mentor. Managers, for example, can become more effective leaders and communicators. CFOs, as well, can have a mentor who serves as a check and balance to their thought processes. 

And in a truly successful mentoring relationship, mentors can grow as well, testing their long-held assumptions and learning from their mentees.

ReadFrom Junior Accountant to CFO – Why Everyone Needs a Mentor” to learn why a mentor can be critical to career advancement at all levels.

Myth 3: Mentors Do the Choosing and Set the Agenda
Mentoring used to be a way to develop high potential accounting talent. Making the selection process a one-way street, however, can mean that companies miss out on developing other talent who could be difference makers for their organization. More importantly, mentees are as critical as the mentors themselves in driving the relationship forward. This means that a healthy mentor/mentee relationship is founded on honesty, where the mentor asks if his or her feedback is helpful and the mentee is clear about what they hope to learn (or are learning).

Myth 4: Mentoring Is About End Goals
Mentoring isn’t simply about checking off things on a performance list. It’s more development driven than that. Focusing only on an end goal, can mean that both the mentor and mentee lose sight of the key soft skills that the mentee may need to progress in their career. 

Myth 5: Mentoring and Coaching Are the Same Thing
Many firms use the terms coaching and mentoring interchangeably, but there is an important mindset difference that can determine the success of the mentoring relationship. According to the article “The Differences Between Coaching and Mentoring” coaching typically is:

  • More task-oriented, while mentoring is more relationship-oriented
  • Short-term focused, while mentoring needs a more long-term approach to be successful. This allows the mentor and mentee to “build a climate of trust that creates an environment in which the mentee can feel secure in sharing the real issues that impact his or her success.”
  • More performance driven in a given moment, while mentoring develops the individual not only for his or her current role, but also for the future

Resource: One way to improve organizational performance is to create a learning culture. Click here to get tips on creating a learning culture and read about why it’s important to building your organization’s future leaders.

Myth 6: One Mentor Is Sufficient
While one mentor is good, why not leverage a mix of expertise and skills to best develop your talent? A network of mentors offers the mentee an opportunity to learn from different people at varying stages of their career. 

Key Takeaways
There are a number of myths about mentoring that can be hurting your finance team’s development. Mentoring is a two-way street, where both participants can learn and grow from each other. There needs to be open communication and a willingness to be development focused, not simply performance focused. Mentoring is also a key part of any organization’s retention strategy. Millennials, in particular, expect to be mentored and are typically more loyal to an individual than a company. And while one mentor is good, an opportunity for mentees to connect with a variety of individuals can allow them to learn from different levels of knowledge and experience.

Your Next Step
No one should walk the job search or hiring road alone. At Clarity Recruitment we help others realize their success through a process that marries proprietary technology with unwavering commitment. Contact us today to take control of your career, or to partner with us to hire well.

Clarity Recruitment, connecting exceptional people with remarkable companies.


How to Get the Most from Remote Staff


In today’s workplace it’s not unusual to employ remote staff. The question is how do you keep them engaged and focused? Finding a motivated employee who is truly self-directed can be challenging. This means that managers play a key role in getting the most from their remote staff. Here are some tips for managing remote employees effectively.

Tip #1 – Build Rapport
Make time to talk about things other than work. It can be tempting to get on a call and just focus on the priorities, but you need to build rapport with every member of your team. This step is fundamental in creating trust and lays the foundation for an honest exchange of feedback.

Tip #2 – Establish Expectations
Set clear expectations. Do this in writing, and also through regular phone calls, video conferences or face-to-face. Remote workers may feel uneasy if they have a lack of direction or regular communication, so position them for success by explaining what needs to be accomplished.

Tip #3 – Equip Completely
According to a Gallup Study remote employees are “27% more likely than non-remote employees to strongly agree they have the materials and equipment they need to do their work right.”  When a remote employee is first hired, send them a box of materials that they need to equip their home office including all hardware and software. Follow up with a phone call to ensure that they have everything they need.

Tip #4 – Schedule Feedback Meetings
Schedule regular one-on-one’s with your remote employees to both give and receive feedback. This will allow you to stay on top of the remote employee’s performance, and troubleshoot any concerns they might have. Make sure to explain the “why” behind higher-level decisions to ensure that the remote worker feels informed and included.

ReadHow to Give Feedback” to learn how effective managers give constructive feedback.

Tip #5 – Accountability
Clearly communicate deadlines and establish accountability to ensure that the remote employee understands how their success will be measured. If your company does not have a formal evaluation process, consider this Gallup finding - workers are 12% more likely to be engaged if they know they’re being evaluated. They also miss 5 fewer days of work per year on average than their non-evaluated peers.

Tip #6 – Impact
One of the keys to getting the most from remote staff is to ensure that they understand how their work impacts the greater goals of the organization. Make it clear that their actions contribute to the company’s success and be specific in showing how. Consider building this information into their performance review in the form of specific metrics.

Key Takeaways
As a manager you need to understand how to keep your remote staff engaged and delivering. 

  • Build rapport
  • Establish expectations and accountability 
  • Make sure your remote staff are fully equipped to do their job well
  • Regularly check in with them to give and receive feedback. 
  • Ensure that they understand how their role impacts the organization and translate this information into specific metrics on their performance review. 

While having remote staff can be uncharted territory for some companies, implementing the tips above greatly increases your chances of having a positive experience.

Your Next Step
No one should walk the job search or hiring road alone. At Clarity Recruitment we help others realize their success through a process that marries proprietary technology with unwavering commitment. Contact ustoday to take control of your career, or to partner with us to hire well.

Clarity Recruitment, connecting exceptional people with remarkable companies.